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GM Recalls Touch Nearly Every Vehicle Model

Tina Robinson2 years ago

With the recent announcement by General Motors that the automaker was recalling more than 8.4 million vehicles earlier this week, the number of vehicles recalled this year is truly staggering. According to NBC news, only three of GM’s models have been unaffected by recalls in 2014.

Record-breaking GM Recalls

In the first half of the year, GM has issued 54 separate recalls which affect about 29 million vehicles worldwide. In the U.S. alone, about 26 million vehicles have been recalled by the automaker. The recalls span from older model GM vehicles no longer in production to brand new vehicles still on dealer lots. The range of defects is equally as expansive from the widely-publicized ignition switch defect to slippery floor mats. 

Out of dozens of model types, only three of GM’s key model vehicles have not had any recall affect them in 2014. NBC news identifies those models as:

  • Chevrolet Equinox
  • GMC Terrain
  • Chevrolet Volt

GM has estimated the 2014 recalls will cost the company about $2.5 billion – and that’s not including payouts through a GM compensation fund that was established for victims of the ignition recall.

While GM has led the way in recalls this year, the auto industry as a whole is also breaking records with 39 million vehicles recalled in the first half of 2014. That number sets the all-time record for vehicles recalled in one year.

The GM Ignition Recall that Started It All 

The wide-spread trend to recall vehicles was started in February when GM announced a recall affecting just over 600,000 Chevy Cobalts and Pontiac G5s with defective ignition switches. The recall was expanded twice more to eventually include 2.6 million vehicles including the Saturn Ion and Sky, Chevrolet HHR, and Pontiac Solstice. A poorly designed ignition switch in these vehicles can slip out of the “run” position, resulting in engine stalls and airbag failure.

The ignition recall put GM under intense scrutiny when it came to light that engineers had known about problems with the ignition switch in these vehicles for more than a decade. To-date the company has only publicly acknowledged 13 deaths and 54 crashes linked to the defect, although safety regulators and advocates believe the true death count stands much higher.

The fallout from the recall has been tremendous: GM has been the subject of two congressional investigations, an SEC investigation, a Department of Justice investigation, and numerous lawsuits and a $35 million fine for the delayed recall.

Additional GM Recalls

In the months following the initial Cobalt recall, GM has issued recalls at a break-neck pace. Most notably, the automaker expanded the scope of the ignition problems to include 512,000 Chevrolet Camaros, 3.2 million mid- to large-size sedans, and the newest addition of 8.2 million more vehicles. The latest recall suggests at least three more fatalities, eight injuries, and seven crashes could have been caused by defective ignition switches.

GM Recall Victims

Thomas J. Henry is representing more than 1,000 GM recall victims across the United States and has been investigating injuries and deaths linked to the recall since day one. The firm launched a nationwide media investigation into the recall in April, which brought forth thousands of affected individuals who had information critical to the investigation – information that the firm has handed over to federal agencies also investigating GM’s sluggish response the recall. As more and more individuals have flocked to Thomas J. Henry for representation, the firm has continued to push GM for a victim settlement fund. The firm has had several talks with GM’s victim compensation expert Ken Feinberg regarding appropriate victim compensation for the thousands affected by a fatal design flaw in ignition switches which left numerous dead and countless others seriously injured. 


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