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NTSB Investigation Finds Emergency Sensor Too Close in Chicago Train Crash

Tina Robinson2 years ago

An investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) into last month’s train derailment at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport has concluded an emergency sensor designed to stop trains was too close, according to Reuters.

Details of the NTSB Investigation

The NTSB recently released a report of its findings into the March 24 trail derailment at O’Hare International. According to the NTSB’s preliminary findings, the fixed trip stop, which is designed to stop trains that are approaching too quickly, was too close to the end of the rails to stop the train. Reports say the train was traveling at 26 mph when it jumped the end of the rails and went part-way up an escalator.

The operator of the train told authorities she had fallen asleep while operating the train. Investigations showed the operator had worked nearly 60 hours over the seven days prior to the accident. Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) said Friday the operator was fired for the “serious safety violation.”

Over 30 people were riding the train when it derailed. Lawsuits have been filed on behalf of some of the patients. None are believed to have been seriously injured.

Since the accident, CTA has taken several steps to increase the safety of its trains including lowering the speed of trains entering the O’Hare stop to 15mph and limited employee work hours.

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