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Teen Dies From Bacterial Infection After Dental Procedure

Demetria Ratchford2 years ago

Investigators have determined that a Maine teenager who died in February was killed by a rare flesh-eating bacteria he contracted following a dental procedure.

Details on the Incident

On February 22nd, 2014, 18-year-old Benjamin LaMantagne died from a rare flesh-eating bacteria after undergoing a routine dental procedure at a Maine dental office.

Three days earlier prior to his death LaMontagne, who had attended Cheverus High School in Long Island, Maine, had his wisdom teeth removed. During the procedure he contracted necrotizing fasciitis, which gave him lots of swelling.

A few days later he became extremely weak and dizzy, needing help to crawl to the bathroom.

On February 22nd, his mother called 911 to report that Benjamin had stopped breathing. Benjamin was pronounced dead shortly after rescue workers arrived to his home.

About Necrotizing Fasciitis

Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but extremely aggressive disease that destroys a layer of connective tissue right underneath the skin that surrounds muscles, blood vessels and nerves. 

Many different types of bacteria, most commonly by group A Streptococcus, can cause necrotizing fasciitis.

These bacteria enter the body through a break in the skin.

Typically these bacteria are treated easily, but they can produce toxins that destroy skin tissue. This infection is very rare, especially after a dental procedure, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that healthy people practicing good hygiene are unlikely to get the infection.


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