Contact us 24/7
View all

Three Concrete Workers Killed in Fiery New Jersey Crash

Hopeanne Wohlers2 years ago

Authorities have identified the three victims who were killed in a fiery collision on I-287 near the New York border on Wednesday. According to My San Antonio, the victims were a father, son, and co-worker.

About the Fatal Accident

At 12:30pm on Tuesday in Mahwah, N.J., a father and son were killed trying to help a co-worker on the side of the road. The coworker, whose cement truck had broke down, was also killed as a passing driver struck all three men and ignited a fiery collision.  The father and son, 42-year-old Santiago F. Mercado and 22-year-old Santiago M. Mercado, worked with 58-year-old Harry Bulatowicz at the Concrete on Demand Company in Oakland. All three men were standing to the left of the disabled cement truck when the accident occurred.

According to police reports, a Toyota driver had slowed down and moved over to avoid the men when a tractor-trailer, driven by Adelbert McKee, collided with the rear of the Toyota as well as the left side of the cement truck and the three men alongside it. The tractor-trailer then continued to collide with the Toyota onthe right shoulder of I-287 where both vehicles caught fire. However, a married couple in the Toyota and McKee were able to escape the vehicles which were engulfed in flames. McKee and the couple were treated for minor injuries but survived the accident ultimately unscathed, whereas the three cement workers were pronounced dead at the scene. Police state that no charges have been filed as of yet but there is an ongoing investigation.

Large Truck Accident Statistics

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were 3,921 fatalities and 104,000 injuries caused by large truck accidents in the U.S. in 2012. Large truck fatalities increased by 4 percent from 2011 to 2012; large truck injuries increased by 18 percent between the two years. About 73% of fatalities were to occupants of vehicles other than the large truck. 

NHTSA classifies large trucks as vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 10,000 pounds.


If you’ve been injured, we can help. Contact us